Tagged: innovative interactivity

The Top Five Multimedia Journalism Websites


Picture in Picture – photo by Daniel Seguin

When I began keeping this blog on evolving multimedia journalism, I felt truly lost in a sea of websites. Sure, I found a few sites that carried some multimedia journalism, but the pieces they carried usually felt like afterthoughts to text or video-only coverage. Adding to the confusion, different journos and media outlets had different names for multimedia content (Visual storytelling? Cross-media content? Digital Journalism?) and no real agreement on what constitutes the content in question.

However, through repeated searching and a lot of late-night-reading, I’ve discovered a few sites that I return to again and again for inspiration and to be moved by excellent content. Some of these sites offer a showcase of cross-media / multimedia content, others primarily promote Audio Slideshows (my favourite ‘new’ form of journalism) and some simply offer instructions and suggestions to multimedia journalists looking to expand or transition their skills.

Here, then, is my list of the five most indispensable multimedia journalism websites operating today. I recommend you check them all out as a barometer of the industry and our place in it as journalists. And leave a comment if you have other suggestions!

Multimedia Muse: Multimedia Muse is a solid multimedia showcase site, with a daily round-up of photojournalism-based pieces. The founders remain anonymous, but admit to being photographers trying to get increased exposure for great content. As an example, check out

Innovative Interactivity: Innovative Interactivity is a very deep site, offering news, tools, tips and showcases of multimedia journalism. My suggestion is to browse through the “categories” on the right-side of the landing page, which offer a way to filter and find the content you are after (for example, training opportunities, advice or interactive examples, etc.).

duckrabbit: Most people who are interested in photojournalism and / or multimedia content eventually find duckrabbit. The team of David White and Benjamin Chesterton produce their own work for media outlets and Not-for-Profits, but they also host consistently lively debate about the nature of multimedia content and what we should be doing as journalists. Their blog is highly recommended reading.

Multimedia Shooter: Another multimedia round-up site, with a very clean layout and excellent content. Multimedia Shooter presents tips, news, commentary and examples of the best of multimedia journalism being produced today. Wonderful site, worthy of repeat visits.

Interactive Narratives: Longtime readers will know my love for the Interactive Narratives site. I have found some stunning pieces through IN (particularly the LA Times’ piece on the Mexican Drug War), and as their title suggests, their showcased content tends to focus on the narrative, and human, side of the journalistic practice.

There are obviously other sites that present learning and training opportunities for multimedia journalists, or highlight some high-quality pieces, but these five are the ones I find myself returning to. I hope they offer you some inspiration and education.

Questions or suggestions? Leave a comment.

Adam Westbrook’s 6×6 Series for Multimedia Journalists


connecting skills to create emotionally moving vehicles is critical for multimedia journalists

I first found Adam Westbrook’s advice for multimedia journalists through the (awesome) Innovative Interactivity site, where he was posting about free tools available for multimedia journos.

A couple of days ago, I found a link on duckrabbit about Adam’s newest creation, a six part series on the skills that emerging multimedia journalists must have. Topics covered include branding, use of video (especially for web-use), storytelling techniques, business models and finding new markets, the importance of audio in engaging pieces, and finally, making things happen, which is about the ups and downs of being a freelance content producer.

I was especially struck by the audio and ‘making things happen‘ parts of the series. I think most multimedia journalists have a primary skillset and a few secondary skills they are employing to make media-rich pieces (ie: they are primarily videographers, who are honing writing skills, photographers who are transitioning to video, etc).

My own bank of skills puts writing and sound design as primary, with photography, video and web work as ascendant, which is a little more unusual than most journos. Therefore, it was gratifying to read Adam’s emphasis on the importance of audio (and his suggestions for best-practices) as sound design is often under used in multimedia journalism.

Also, every freelance journalist / content creator can use an energy boost during even the brightest of days. Reading Adam’s piece on making things happen is essential for anyone who is crafting content in this shifting media landscape, and struggles with the endless riptide of what-ifs that accompany being an independent entrepreneur.

In short, this six-part series offers every multimedia journalist advice and tips for our emerging craft, without employing a heavy-hand or extensive external reading. I recommend this series to anyone who is simply trying to make their good work great, or at least, more satisfying.

See Adam Westbrook’s full series here.