Canadian Music Industry Lobbying for More Rights and Freedoms Than You or I Have

As noted before on Fauna Corporation, Michael Geist is more or less The Man when it comes to Canadian copyright and online privacy legislation.

A post from Geist on BoingBoing today points out that the Canadian music industry is about to lobby the Canadian government for more control and rights over what people post through blogs, social networking sites, search engines and video sites – including things intended for parody and satire – while putting liability on the sites and networks that carry the content. They also want a tax on new iPods, because, you know, that’s why Canadian records don’t sell. Insert incredibly loud sigh and mega-eye-roll here.

It all reminds me of when Canada Post tried to levy a 5 cent tax on every email being sent because people were sending fewer letters as email became more common. The result? Laughter, then even fewer letters being sent.

I would be surprised if the Canadian record labels that I actively support (and I mean actively support; I buy a lot of music) are amongst those lobbying government (ie: smaller, more interesting labels with more lateral business models), but at this point I don’t know enough about it. So we’ll see what shakes down in Parliament.

Either way, this is the kind of thing that often involves asking for the moon because, with concessions, you’ll probably get the sky. So it seemed appropriate to point some traffic to Geist’s post (via Cory Doctorow) on BoingBoing to raise awareness that this is happening.

Have a read, have a think, and then buy some wicked Canadian music directly from the artists that create it, because they are keeping up with the times and the choices consumers are making. And generally speaking, they’re not trying to control what you share.

Reactions to SOPA legislation

There are a lot of websites that are currently protesting the US’s proposed SOPA legislation. Obviously a lot of ink has been spilled (both for and against) such restrictive online policing, but I’ve really appreciated the work done by BoingBoing on this, because they often provide a Canadian perspective via the work of Michael Geist.

Cooler still is how BoingBoing chose to protest the legislation today – by taking their site offline and providing info about their chosen form of protest. Heavy duty.

Adidas Skateboarding in Montreal

When I was younger (and scabbier) I was a skateboarder.

Skating is one of those things that never really leaves your system, even long after you quit. I may not be able to do the tricks I once did (and certainly can’t do the ones I tell people I once did), but I am always inspired by skating.

The Adidas Skateboarding Montreal video, below, is fun on a few levels.

  • The production values are unreal, with great shots, editing and post-production (check out the altered Metro & public building signage!)
  • It is shot in Montreal and features Montreal musicians in the soundtrack
  • The skaters are doing things (sooooo casually!) that are totally insane.

Finally, though, the reason I like this video is because I saw it being filmed. I was taking a walk on my lunch break this past September, and saw this same group of skaters working over a couple of public statues and filming themselves doing it.

Then, as now, I stopped to watch. I am constantly marveling at how far skateboarding, skate videos, and online videos in general have come in the last few years.

Check it out, then head out and pop a couple ollie-impossible-to-nose-slides in celebration.

If nothing else, this video may show off the awesomeness of Montreal.
But always remember to watch out for les Flics!

Wipeout Video Game Comes to Life

Good news for fans of the Wipeout video game series, RC racing, or levitating cars!

Researchers at the Japan Institute of Technology are apparently looking into Quantum Levitation (which, as you know, is so much better than non-quantum levitation) and are using a liquid nitrogen-fueled homage to Wipeout to show how it works.

Hard to verify the authenticity of the research, but a fun idea.

Via: Boing Boing

New Year, New Focus

detail of silk-screen by todd stewart of bree, ree

Happy new year to Fauna Corporation readers!

2012 is upon us and I’m going to be posting to Fauna Corporation again, albeit with a slightly different focus.

Going forward, I will be sharing the things that I create (text, photos, sketches, music), the things that inspire me — and hopefully, you — to create (others’ work, links, quotes, ideas, cool creative executions), and the tools I use to create (hardware, software, apps, etc).

The evolving digital narratives are all around us, and we participate in them each day with the smart phones, tablets, laptops and other digital hardware that have become seamless extensions of us.

Rather than focusing on digital advertising, multimedia journalism, or any other specific industry, this little blog will simply throw some light on the creativity that results from our ever-expanding, ever present, digital means.

I haven’t posted very much over the last long while because I’ve been reeling from a series of personal tragedies. A close friend, my brother, my father and my mother all passed away within the span of the last two years, and frankly, I’ve struggled to just hold it together. Blogging, and more expressly, sharing what I am thinking about, has been far from my mind.

But, as I have said, 2012 is upon us, and times have changed.

Hopefully this new Fauna Corporation focus offers something to you. And hopefully you’ll share the fruits of your own creative channels.

Take good care in 2012.